This poast is important

If we were you, dear readers, we might glaze over some of our more wordy poasts too. We implore you to let this be the exception because we have serious things to talk about. Often we criticize other builders for not actually attaching pieces in their Lego MOCs. Sometimes we even care so much as to create a flickr group dedicated to showcasing MOCs that meet our expectations of how people should play with their toys.




One of our newest readers Dave Kaleta just poasted this picture of a microscale building. It appears to be a power plant, but that does not matter. If you look closely, you will notice the radioactive symbol made out of cheese slopes and other irrelevant parts. Normally we, to say the least, abhor this way of building, since nearly no one bothers to actually attach the Lego parts together.

Now, before you point out that the cheese slopes actually aren't attached to anything (we too would be chomping at the bit to prove matty wrong), note the trans-clear panel in the front. This keeps the parts from falling out when they are anywhere but lying down (your Lego MOC should be able to stay together no matter which direction it faces). This is a real technique called "trapping".

In conclusion, put trans-clear panels or some other trans-clear parts in front of and behind your cheese slope mosaics even if it compromises the aesthetics so that matty is happy with your MOC.

7 comments:

  1. But it's so un-aesthetically pleasing! ;-)

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  2. This post has all the trappings of elitism.

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  3. Trapping is okay, as long as it looks cool. This, not so much.

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  4. This example is just a means to shoehorn my most valued opinions on how one should play with his or her building toys, Leigh. Also note that a third or fourth grader built this.

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  5. Damn straight Matt, cause if I built it, there'd be parts floating everywhere, like a primordial stew!

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